Monday, April 29, 2013

Future Noir, & A Chance to #WIN a Loaded Kindle

First, a quick SALE Update:

The Truth About Letting Go is only 99 cents until 5/5--so if you haven't gotten it yet, go here~


The Truth About Faking is also just 99 cents, so it's major spring SALE day! whee~

* * *

Now for the awesomeness that is Debt Collector. (I'm having the privilege of beta-reading this serial, and I'm telling you, it just gets better and better.)

Great writer-friend Susan Quinn is here to explain what Future Noir is, tell how she uses it in her FAB new serial, and give you a chance to #WIN a Kindle loaded with the first three Debt Collector books!

(P.S. I'M the Looper critter in this piece... squee!!!)

~ ~ ~

Future-Noir or Why Retro Science Fiction is Awesome
by Susan Kaye Quinn author of the future-noir serial Debt Collector

Apparently, I write strange science fiction.

This comes up whenever I try to classify my stories to readers, bloggers, the lady at the checkout stand, my mother, or Amazon (who insists that I need a "category" in which to place my books; I insist I need about five). Apparently I write novels that mash together all kinds of genres in an indiscriminate cross-pollenation that would have Isaac Asimov turning in his grave... if he hadn't done the same sort of thing himself as a young man (winking at you, Isaac!).

Seriously, if you want to see a good bar brawl among literary types, just ask them what's the genre of Hunger Games or Time Traveler's Wife or any Nicolas Sparks novel, and watch the rhetoric fly! I personally have a very laizzez-faire approach toward genre definitions, which is sure to infuriate genre-disciplinarians. (I don't mention my east-indian-influenced steampunk fantasy romance to genre-afficianados. I don't want them to rupture something.)

I figure the story comes first; people can decide what genre it is after it's written. So no one was more surprised than me when I ended up writing a future-noir.

On a long car ride, just me and my Muse...

Muse: The Debt Collector.

Me: Er, what? Who are you?

Muse: When people's debts exceed their future potential contributions to society, he
cashes them out.

Me: Whoa. Tell me more.

Muse: He extracts their life energy and transfers it to a "high potential" - someone who
can use it to make greater contributions to the world.

Me: Holy... that's a great idea.

Muse: He's a good man with bad power. And it's future-noir.

Me: Future-noir! Cool! Uh, what is that exactly?


Muse: Dark. Gritty. Futuristic but retro at the same time.

Me: Oh... like Blade Runner... Holy cats, this is awesome.

Muse: You're welcome.

I ran (well, okay, drove) home and wrote the first episode. It was dark, gritty. Lots of low light,
shady characters, set in a futuristic LA where the smog pooled at the impoverished feet of the city and the wealthy high-potentials lived above it all in the clean, clear air, taking their life-energy-hits courtesy of the titular Debt Collectors. The fashion was retro-sexy. The feel was future-dystopian. Did I mention it's gritty? And dark?

I send it off to my critique partner... (this is me--*squee*!!!)


My Crit Partner (LTM): Hey, your new Debt Collector story reminds me of Looper!

Me: Well, it is future noir. *acts like I know what I'm talking about*

LTM: Seriously. I totally see Lirium as a young Joseph Gordon-Levitt! And it totally reads like noir. You know, like Double Indemnity!?

Me: Double what? That's not one of those old black-n-white films, is it?

LTM: All those noir films were black-n-white.

yessss....  ;o)
Me: Right! I knew that. (Sure.) Anyway, I think of Lirium more as James McAvoy in a trenchcoat.

LTM: I can work with that. (Oh, yesss... I can. ;o)

*we both drool on the picture*

Wait, what was I saying?




Right. Future-noir. Gritty retro feel -- where the men wear trenchcoats and slick suits and the women wear bright red lipstick and carry a mini-revolver under their skirts - only it's a futuristic story with time-travel (Looper) or berzerker androids (Blade Runner) or life-energy transfers (Debt Collector) that change the landscape. It's raw. It's sexy. It's awesome.


It looks something like this.

Nice Blogger Lady: What genre is that?

Me: Future-noir.

NBL: What's future-noir?

Me: It's a science fictiony, mystery type of story. Sort of a mix between urban fantasy and noir,
with a thriller twist. There could be romance in there too. Like Blade Runner. Or Looper!

NBL: I'll just call it science fiction.

Me: Works for me. :)



Susan Kaye Quinn is the author of the bestselling YA SF Mindjack series. Her new Debt Collector serial is her more grown-up SF that she likes to call future-noir. Her steampunk fantasy romance is temporarily
on hold while she madly writes episodes to keep Lirium (the titular Debt Collector) happy. Plus she needs to leave time to play on Facebook.

Susan has a lot of degrees in engineering, which come in handy when dreaming up dangerous mind powers, future dystopias, and slightly plausible steampunk inventions. Mostly she sits around in her pajamas in awe that she gets make stuff up full-time. You can find her at www.susankayequinn.com

What's your life worth on the open market? A debt collector can tell you precisely.

Delirium (Debt Collector 1) is now available on Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo |  iTunes | Smashwords.

See the Debt Collector website to check all the latest episode releases and goings on in the Debt Collector
world.

And have a super week, reader- and writer-friends~ <3


5 comments:

Pat Hatt said...

Sounds like some great sci fi, you rarely hear awesomeness and debt collector in the same sentence lol

Susan Kaye Quinn said...

Aw, thanks for having me, Leigh! And for all your AMAZING critiques of the books!!

Old Kitty said...

I already asked Susan if I could borrow her amazing muse for a bit...!! Yay! take care
x

Barbara Watson said...

Hhaaaa! That whole thing is awesome. Genre is a tough, tough thing. Sometimes I think it can even turn people off because they might say, "Hmmm. I don't like ____."

Creepy Query Girl said...

Susan's new series looks just gorgeous and I've heard so many fabulous things.